The Man Who Won’t Sit Still 1

The Man Who Won’t Sit Still

“I would have a vineyard and make wine.” This is the answer Paul Koronis gave me about 20-years ago when I asked him what his perfect job or life would look like.

I imagined him standing on top of a hillside in Italy or Spain, looking over his large patch of land with rows and rows of vines, breathing in the juice of the grapes in the air. He would then go down among his crops, raise his straw hat up to let some air circulate around his head as he tested to see if the grapes were ripe with some machine he had someone he met through a mutual friend invent.

I had no idea then that that would not be that far away from the truth of it all.

I have given you a name, but not a real introduction to the man who won’t sit still. I will do it with three words: kind, giving, inspiring.

The Man Who Won’t Sit Still 2
From TEDxLarnaca

Not long after we met, he asked me to share some of my poems with him — at the time they were not very good at all. I sent him some and after a while he rang me up while I was with friends and just kept saying how talented he thought I was, and how I should really find a publisher. I thought he was mad, thought it was lovely of him to take time out of his day to tell me all these things, but I wondered if he was late for his tea party.

The hatching of plans, plans that I could turn into reality, was our focus at much of our coffee dates. I could write theatre plays, why not, I loved them, I could go and meet famous poets, why not, the university was right there if I was to go to the UK to do my master’s degree. I could get the guy, I could make babies, I could build a house, why not, I had everything I needed, according to him, nothing was impossible.

I had other ideas that didn’t include a shred of confidence to do all these things until much later.

The Man Who Won’t Sit Still 3
With Anna Koukkides-Procopiou for the Unlocking Female Leadership workshops

But did we talk about his plans? Not really. He was, and still is, very giving in that way. If I asked what was new, he would almost always say “running, always running. Doing this and that.” He has his head very well screwed on you see, and his eyes are always looking straight ahead.

Going to the UK for me came around, he supported me then, gave me advice, was a voice at the back of my head every time I went to the library or did something I thought I would never have the courage to do.

The UK came and went and then I was off on my next adventure to find romance. Paul was one of the few who supported my decision to go to a foreign land to meet a complete stranger — of course he did, he is a great believer of big dreams coming true.

Then a gigantic shift came for him. He told me he getting involved with TEDx talks. TED? What were TED Talks? What was TEDx? How would I know what they were? I was too involved in my own world to know of inspirational talks, ideas worth spreading, of understanding big concepts, and listening, really listening, to other people’s talks.

But did we talk about his plans? Not really. He was, and still is, very giving in that way. If I asked what was new, he would almost always say “running, always running. Doing this and that.” He has his head very well screwed on you see, and his eyes are always looking straight ahead.

Going to the UK for me came around, he supported me then, gave me advice, was a voice at the back of my head every time I went to the library or did something I thought I would never have the courage to do.

The UK came and went and then I was off on my next adventure to find romance. Paul was one of the few who supported my decision to go to a foreign land to meet a complete stranger — of course he did, he is a great believer of big dreams coming true.

Then a gigantic shift came for him. He told me he getting involved with TEDx talks. TED? What were TED Talks? What was TEDx? How would I know what they were? I was too involved in my own world to know of inspirational talks, ideas worth spreading, of understanding big concepts, and listening, really listening, to other people’s talks.
Gardens of the Future

The first TEDx event in Cyprus that he was involved in was in February 2013 with TEDxNicosia. I had just gotten a new job as a journalist and going to this TEDx event was perfect timing as the next chapter of my life involved interviewing and really listening to other people’s stories.

I was amazed at what he had become a part of and of all the other TEDx Talks he has been behind since. I asked one of the speakers to be friends on Facebook and he sent me a message saying ‘any friend of Paul’s is a friend of mine.’ This is the kind of vibe you get every time you say you know Paul. He gives people chances, he helps them find solutions, he praises them, he sees people for what they are, puts no boundaries on what kind of person you have to be to be part of his great network, he is real.

The Man Who Won’t Sit Still 5
Gardens of the Future

Am I bias? Maybe. Without him I would have never known about writing on Medium, without him I would have never met some of the people in my life now, without him I perhaps would have never had the confidence or courage to do half the things I have done in my life. But hey, maybe I am not, there are enough people out there who will agree with everything in the previous paragraph, I bet his vineyard on it — we will get to that.

After the TEDx Talks there was no stopping him. He co-founded Unlocking Female Leadership (https://bit.ly/3sO5i62), a series of experiential and research focused workshops. He became part of an organisation to do with people with rare diseases called Monathika Xamogela (Unique Smiles) (https://bit.ly/3aeqDz8). And his most recent adventure? This is where the vineyards come in.

See Paul has always had a green thumb and a massive heart. Combine the two and what do you get? You get a project called Gardens of the Future in the heart of Nicosia with the purpose of tackling the climate crisis while bringing people together to cultivate a garden and so much more (https://bit.ly/3LzUf6O). Paul was heavily involved in the project’s conception and is there every chance he gets making sure the hub is becoming the green paradise he had always had in mind, complete with a grape vine.

Am I bias? Maybe. Without him I would have never known about writing on Medium, without him I would have never met some of the people in my life now, without him I perhaps would have never had the confidence or courage to do half the things I have done in my life. But hey, maybe I am not, there are enough people out there who will agree with everything in the previous paragraph, I bet his vineyard on it — we will get to that.

After the TEDx Talks there was no stopping him. He co-founded Unlocking Female Leadership (https://bit.ly/3sO5i62), a series of experiential and research focused workshops. He became part of an organisation to do with people with rare diseases called Monathika Xamogela (Unique Smiles) (https://bit.ly/3aeqDz8). And his most recent adventure? This is where the vineyards come in.

See Paul has always had a green thumb and a massive heart. Combine the two and what do you get? You get a project called Gardens of the Future in the heart of Nicosia with the purpose of tackling the climate crisis while bringing people together to cultivate a garden and so much more (https://bit.ly/3LzUf6O). Paul was heavily involved in the project’s conception and is there every chance he gets making sure the hub is becoming the green paradise he had always had in mind, complete with a grape vine.

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